The Hemme Fatale Collection by Reisha

The Hemme Fatale Collection by Reisha
Written by Darnell Jordan
 
 
This past June, fine art photographer and painter Reisha held her first solo show at the William Hill Gallery in Chicago, IL. The event was an intimate affair that celebrated her latest collection, Hemme Fatale.
 
With Hemme Fatale, Reisha offers a glimpse into the evolution of masculinity. The collection consists of thought-provoking portraits that range from a clean-cut gentleman in a top coat and fedora (circa 1940s), to a current-day hipster sporting a full beard and man-bun.  
 
“It’s not a criticism, it’s an observation. What it meant to be a man 20 or 30 yrs ago is not the same now. It’s tricky for everybody involved, including women, relationships, workplace, and family. I think there’s a big discussion there,” says Reisha.
 
The idea of masculinity has always been a controversial topic. Traditionally, there has been a solid line between what’s considered to be masculine and feminine. Society relentlessly enforced that line, spewing ridicule to those who dared to cross it. However, over the years we have seen that line become a faint shadow, opening the door for a more liberal society.
 
Reisha cleverly displays that shift in many of her portraits of men, where she uses both feminine and masculine attributes in the same piece. “I use floral print and feminine ideas to blur the lines so you can look at it a different way. You usually see men in harder lines, harder colors”, she says.
 
Each of Reisha’s pieces start with a background. She then creates an outline and begins a jig-saw puzzle process of filling the outline with individual pieces of paper, other materials, and color to bring her vision to life. The process is so intricate that it usually takes her a few months to complete each piece.
 
“It gets to a point where they get difficult for me and I have to put them down, not work on them, and then just come back to them,” says Reisha.
 
What stood out to me most about Reisha’s art is how her method of using various types of paper and material allows her to create amazingly textured pieces.
 
At most art shows, artists have a strict “no-touching” rule, especially if the pieces are delicately made. Surprisingly, Reisha invites viewers to touch her art, feel the texture, and take in the energy.  
 
Reisha started in photography and naturally evolved into art. She excels in portraits, which is highlighted in her current collection. She plans to eventually branch out into more scenic pieces. Self taught, Reisha takes great pride in creating every aspect of her art.
 
“I framed everything myself, and stained the wood. So, everything I did myself.”
 
Her preceding collections are We Are Everything, Alpha Female, and Collaboration of Sexy.
 
Such as a true artist does, she has done a remarkable job at reflecting the times we live in through Hemme Fatale.
 
In a country currently full of tension and division, creative expression is more important than ever. I’m extremely excited to see what Reisha has in store for the world!

 

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